Tylwyth Vila

PhotoAlt

This could be worse.

Photos

Text

ashahills:

deliciousmaletears:

It’s Invasion Day - you know what that means, white Australians celebrating the fact that their ancestors caused the complete and utter destruction of native lands and aboriginal communities. Their drunken belligerence at being informed of this fact simply solidifies my resolve to be as…

What i don’t understand is why people are blaming us even today for things that happened years ago that we had no part in. its like blaming every german for the Holocaust. yes what happened was shit but its a different time these days. Australia day to me isn’t about when the “whites arrived” its a day to celebrate and be proud of this country no matter what colour or race you are.

"Its like blaming every German for the Holocaust

THANK YOU. I have taken no part in committing genocide. My family has been part of this country for over a century +. Why do my own people hate me for something I never did and would never do? I had no more choice than you did to be born to this country. I’m not sure why my great, great, great grandparents came here but I’m pretty sure it wasn’t to kill or to destroy.

I have not inherited anything. Past crimes are not passed on to their children. Even if you don’t see me as family, all Australians are family to me. If you can’t see through my skin colour - that is your issue. Your racism that you have to deal with.

My family does not have ties to the landing/invasion (at least that I know of) so I can’t celebrate my ancestors arrival but we should have a day to celebrate what we have in Australia - shouldn’t we? Is that so bad? We can place on any other day of the year but I doubt people would be happy anyway. Any day that us “white” people celebrate will still be celebrating when some idiots came did some stupid things right?

I’m not asking that you be okay with people taking land or treating people as inferior. All I’m asking is that you stop telling me that I did it, that it is my fault. That my family did it.

I would not treat you as anything but my equal.

Photos

Text

theflailingfangirl:

gothamsnexttoprobin:

charmancler:

there are 2 sexes but a lot of genders. when a child is born, you have to take care of them as the sex they are because they are uncapable of understanding the difference between all the gender identities. it’s not trans*phobic or cissexist it’s literally giving the child proper care

THANK YOU

YES. Let them be free to realise their gender, but don’t go crazy either. Sometimes, you just have to chill out a little.

Except this is wrong on many levels. There are more than two sexes. Way more.

This is the Australian classification (where I am):

Intersex status means the status of having physical, hormonal or genetic features that are:

(a) neither wholly female nor wholly male; or (b) a combination of female and male; or (c) neither female nor male

You do not take care of a child “as the sex”. This is stupid. In fact you are being stupid. You think children can’t understand that humans are more important than skin, hair, the way they speak or the way they act? Wow. Please don’t get involved with them.

People are people and should be treated as such. The only way kids learn that there is really a divide between sexes is because people tell them there is. Don’t ever raise a child by their sex. Raise them by what they like and don’t like, what they are capable of doing and what they can understand.

Quite simply - if you don’t tell a child that can’t do things because of their sex, then they will be who they are without the stupid labels.

Tell your kids from a young age that they can be anyone, regardless or sex, and they will grow up to believe it.

By growing your kids by sex, they’ll define themselves by their sex. That would be so sad because when I ask them what they are, they’ll say “Female” or “Male” instead of saying “Nice” or “Loyal”.

You know. The important things.

I understand that we have to acknowledge that there are sexes. I’m not running away from this. I’m pretty sure that everyone is missing the point that this is NOT A DEFINING FACTOR of … anything really. Except body parts.

And if we are going to raise people by body parts then, people with missing limbs are going to have to like neon yellow and people with heart conditions better start at flower arranging.

———

Side note: I was raised gender neutral and I turned out flipping fine thank you. No, “This is for boys” and “This is for girls” and all that damaged me from this experience was to accept people for who they are. Scary.

Photos

daydreamer78:

Shinjuku Gyoen: Home of The Garden of Words
It is hardly unexpected that The Garden of Words, Makoto Shinkai’s latest film, has settings inspired by real world locations: the garden featured prominently in the story is Shinjuku Gyoen, a public park  in Shinjuku and Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan. Like its anime counterpart, Shinjuku Garden blends three distinct styles: French Formal, English Landscape and Japanese traditional, into one location. Shinjuku Gyoen is open from 9:00 until 16:30, except on Mondays, when it is closed (save blossom and chrysanthemum seasons; from March to April and in November, the garden is open seven days of the week). Admissions into the park is 200 yen for adults and 50 yen for children. In the images below, the image on top is the anime representation, whereas the real-world equivalent is on the bottom.
The garden is 58.3 hectares in area. It was originally intended for the royalty and was completed in 1906. By 1949, the gardens became open to the public as “National Park Shinjuku Imperial Gardens”. There are more than 20000 trees in the gardens, including some 1500 cherry trees. Had the images’ source not been mentioned, it is highly likely that it would have taken much closer inspection to discern which images are real and which ones are from the anime: the attention to detail and composition is just that impressive, although given that this is a Makoto Shinkai work, such an observation is hardly unexpected.

daydreamer78:

Shinjuku Gyoen: Home of The Garden of Words
It is hardly unexpected that The Garden of Words, Makoto Shinkai’s latest film, has settings inspired by real world locations: the garden featured prominently in the story is Shinjuku Gyoen, a public park  in Shinjuku and Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan. Like its anime counterpart, Shinjuku Garden blends three distinct styles: French Formal, English Landscape and Japanese traditional, into one location. Shinjuku Gyoen is open from 9:00 until 16:30, except on Mondays, when it is closed (save blossom and chrysanthemum seasons; from March to April and in November, the garden is open seven days of the week). Admissions into the park is 200 yen for adults and 50 yen for children. In the images below, the image on top is the anime representation, whereas the real-world equivalent is on the bottom.
The garden is 58.3 hectares in area. It was originally intended for the royalty and was completed in 1906. By 1949, the gardens became open to the public as “National Park Shinjuku Imperial Gardens”. There are more than 20000 trees in the gardens, including some 1500 cherry trees. Had the images’ source not been mentioned, it is highly likely that it would have taken much closer inspection to discern which images are real and which ones are from the anime: the attention to detail and composition is just that impressive, although given that this is a Makoto Shinkai work, such an observation is hardly unexpected.

daydreamer78:

Shinjuku Gyoen: Home of The Garden of Words
It is hardly unexpected that The Garden of Words, Makoto Shinkai’s latest film, has settings inspired by real world locations: the garden featured prominently in the story is Shinjuku Gyoen, a public park  in Shinjuku and Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan. Like its anime counterpart, Shinjuku Garden blends three distinct styles: French Formal, English Landscape and Japanese traditional, into one location. Shinjuku Gyoen is open from 9:00 until 16:30, except on Mondays, when it is closed (save blossom and chrysanthemum seasons; from March to April and in November, the garden is open seven days of the week). Admissions into the park is 200 yen for adults and 50 yen for children. In the images below, the image on top is the anime representation, whereas the real-world equivalent is on the bottom.
The garden is 58.3 hectares in area. It was originally intended for the royalty and was completed in 1906. By 1949, the gardens became open to the public as “National Park Shinjuku Imperial Gardens”. There are more than 20000 trees in the gardens, including some 1500 cherry trees. Had the images’ source not been mentioned, it is highly likely that it would have taken much closer inspection to discern which images are real and which ones are from the anime: the attention to detail and composition is just that impressive, although given that this is a Makoto Shinkai work, such an observation is hardly unexpected.

daydreamer78:

Shinjuku Gyoen: Home of The Garden of Words
It is hardly unexpected that The Garden of Words, Makoto Shinkai’s latest film, has settings inspired by real world locations: the garden featured prominently in the story is Shinjuku Gyoen, a public park  in Shinjuku and Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan. Like its anime counterpart, Shinjuku Garden blends three distinct styles: French Formal, English Landscape and Japanese traditional, into one location. Shinjuku Gyoen is open from 9:00 until 16:30, except on Mondays, when it is closed (save blossom and chrysanthemum seasons; from March to April and in November, the garden is open seven days of the week). Admissions into the park is 200 yen for adults and 50 yen for children. In the images below, the image on top is the anime representation, whereas the real-world equivalent is on the bottom.
The garden is 58.3 hectares in area. It was originally intended for the royalty and was completed in 1906. By 1949, the gardens became open to the public as “National Park Shinjuku Imperial Gardens”. There are more than 20000 trees in the gardens, including some 1500 cherry trees. Had the images’ source not been mentioned, it is highly likely that it would have taken much closer inspection to discern which images are real and which ones are from the anime: the attention to detail and composition is just that impressive, although given that this is a Makoto Shinkai work, such an observation is hardly unexpected.

daydreamer78:

Shinjuku Gyoen: Home of The Garden of Words
It is hardly unexpected that The Garden of Words, Makoto Shinkai’s latest film, has settings inspired by real world locations: the garden featured prominently in the story is Shinjuku Gyoen, a public park  in Shinjuku and Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan. Like its anime counterpart, Shinjuku Garden blends three distinct styles: French Formal, English Landscape and Japanese traditional, into one location. Shinjuku Gyoen is open from 9:00 until 16:30, except on Mondays, when it is closed (save blossom and chrysanthemum seasons; from March to April and in November, the garden is open seven days of the week). Admissions into the park is 200 yen for adults and 50 yen for children. In the images below, the image on top is the anime representation, whereas the real-world equivalent is on the bottom.
The garden is 58.3 hectares in area. It was originally intended for the royalty and was completed in 1906. By 1949, the gardens became open to the public as “National Park Shinjuku Imperial Gardens”. There are more than 20000 trees in the gardens, including some 1500 cherry trees. Had the images’ source not been mentioned, it is highly likely that it would have taken much closer inspection to discern which images are real and which ones are from the anime: the attention to detail and composition is just that impressive, although given that this is a Makoto Shinkai work, such an observation is hardly unexpected.

daydreamer78:

Shinjuku Gyoen: Home of The Garden of Words
It is hardly unexpected that The Garden of Words, Makoto Shinkai’s latest film, has settings inspired by real world locations: the garden featured prominently in the story is Shinjuku Gyoen, a public park  in Shinjuku and Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan. Like its anime counterpart, Shinjuku Garden blends three distinct styles: French Formal, English Landscape and Japanese traditional, into one location. Shinjuku Gyoen is open from 9:00 until 16:30, except on Mondays, when it is closed (save blossom and chrysanthemum seasons; from March to April and in November, the garden is open seven days of the week). Admissions into the park is 200 yen for adults and 50 yen for children. In the images below, the image on top is the anime representation, whereas the real-world equivalent is on the bottom.
The garden is 58.3 hectares in area. It was originally intended for the royalty and was completed in 1906. By 1949, the gardens became open to the public as “National Park Shinjuku Imperial Gardens”. There are more than 20000 trees in the gardens, including some 1500 cherry trees. Had the images’ source not been mentioned, it is highly likely that it would have taken much closer inspection to discern which images are real and which ones are from the anime: the attention to detail and composition is just that impressive, although given that this is a Makoto Shinkai work, such an observation is hardly unexpected.

daydreamer78:

Shinjuku Gyoen: Home of The Garden of Words

It is hardly unexpected that The Garden of Words, Makoto Shinkai’s latest film, has settings inspired by real world locations: the garden featured prominently in the story is Shinjuku Gyoen, a public park  in Shinjuku and Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan. Like its anime counterpart, Shinjuku Garden blends three distinct styles: French Formal, English Landscape and Japanese traditional, into one location. Shinjuku Gyoen is open from 9:00 until 16:30, except on Mondays, when it is closed (save blossom and chrysanthemum seasons; from March to April and in November, the garden is open seven days of the week). Admissions into the park is 200 yen for adults and 50 yen for children. In the images below, the image on top is the anime representation, whereas the real-world equivalent is on the bottom.

The garden is 58.3 hectares in area. It was originally intended for the royalty and was completed in 1906. By 1949, the gardens became open to the public as “National Park Shinjuku Imperial Gardens”. There are more than 20000 trees in the gardens, including some 1500 cherry trees. Had the images’ source not been mentioned, it is highly likely that it would have taken much closer inspection to discern which images are real and which ones are from the anime: the attention to detail and composition is just that impressive, although given that this is a Makoto Shinkai work, such an observation is hardly unexpected.

Photos

Link

Let's Talk About Scott Lobdell

findchaos:

postcardsfromspace:

Long story short: A few days ago, cartoonist MariNaomi wrote an op-ed about being harassed by professional comic-book writer Scott Lobdell on a panel at a convention. MariNaomi was very careful to avoid identifying information, but Lobdell apparently read the piece and recognized himself—maybe…

Pretty much everything I could say. Kudos, Rae.

Link

Deadpool's sexuality

fuckyesdeadpool:

12/03/13 edit: Tonight on Twitter, Deadpool writer Gerry Duggan confirmed that Deadpool is queer, describing him as being omnisexual which is often used interchangeably with pansexual (a more inclusive form of bisexuality) so the following should now be read in the context…

Video

thatoboekid:

tamarussia:

sungodphoebus:

ohgoditsafurry:

foervraengd:

Okay so I followed this video about foreshortening and…

Sycra. I love you so much for making this video.

YOU GOTTA BE FUCKING SHITTING ME

guys

GUYS

SHIT

image

SHIT GUYS

are you shitting me right now

years of me avoiding foreshortening aND IT WAS THIS EASY??

reblogging againg because holy cow, this HELPS

Photos

digifreaks:

This Is What Happens When You Make Too Good Of A Plastic Bottle.
Source
Apparently, the Tiger & Bunny series had a range of muscular bottles merchandises as shown in the top image. And what happens if you rip away all the outer packaging (aka the clothes) and fill it with coffee-flavoured milk?
You actually do get a really sculpted and near perfect muscular body.
Wow.
I’m actually more wow at the effort they took to actually make the mould of the plastic bottle so precise and sculpted. O.o

digifreaks:

This Is What Happens When You Make Too Good Of A Plastic Bottle.
Source
Apparently, the Tiger & Bunny series had a range of muscular bottles merchandises as shown in the top image. And what happens if you rip away all the outer packaging (aka the clothes) and fill it with coffee-flavoured milk?
You actually do get a really sculpted and near perfect muscular body.
Wow.
I’m actually more wow at the effort they took to actually make the mould of the plastic bottle so precise and sculpted. O.o

digifreaks:

This Is What Happens When You Make Too Good Of A Plastic Bottle.
Source
Apparently, the Tiger & Bunny series had a range of muscular bottles merchandises as shown in the top image. And what happens if you rip away all the outer packaging (aka the clothes) and fill it with coffee-flavoured milk?
You actually do get a really sculpted and near perfect muscular body.
Wow.
I’m actually more wow at the effort they took to actually make the mould of the plastic bottle so precise and sculpted. O.o

digifreaks:

This Is What Happens When You Make Too Good Of A Plastic Bottle.

Source

Apparently, the Tiger & Bunny series had a range of muscular bottles merchandises as shown in the top image. And what happens if you rip away all the outer packaging (aka the clothes) and fill it with coffee-flavoured milk?

You actually do get a really sculpted and near perfect muscular body.

Wow.

I’m actually more wow at the effort they took to actually make the mould of the plastic bottle so precise and sculpted. O.o

Palladium by Anarchei